What is Keratoconus?

Keratoconus is a non-inflammatory eye condition in which the cornea progressively thins and weakens, causing the development of a cone-like bulge and optical irregularity.

Keratoconus

Symptoms  

Keratoconus typically makes in first appearance in individuals who are in their late teens or early twenties.  It may progress for years, and then slow or stabilize. Each eye may be affected differently.

In the early stages of keratoconus, people might experience:

  • Slight blurring of vision
  • Distortion of vision
  • Increased sensitivity to light

The cornea is responsible for focusing most of the light that comes into the eye. Therefore, abnormalities of the cornea, such as keratoconus, can have a major impact on a person’s daily life.

Corneal Cross-Linking- Your link to stronger eyes

Cross-linking is a minimally invasive outpatient procedure that combines the use of UVA light and riboflavin eye drops to add stiffness to corneas which have been weakened. Cross-linking is considered the standard of care around the world for keratoconus and corneal ectasia.

corena

Riboflavin

Riboflavin (vitamin B2) is important for cell growth and production.

Under the conditions used for corneal collagen cross-linking, riboflavin 5’- phosphate functions as a photo enhancer which enables the cross-linking reaction to occur.

 

Ultra-Violet A (UVA)

UVA is one of the three types of invisible light rays given off by the sun and is the weakest of the three. A UV light source is applied to irradiate the cornea after it has been soaked in the photo enhancing riboflavin solution. This cross-linking process stiffens the cornea by increasing the number of molecular bonds, or cross-links, in the collagen.

Who We Treat

Patients over the age of 14 who have been diagnosed with progressive keratoconus or corneal ectasia should ask their doctor about corneal cross-linking.

 

Your Solution to an Unanswered Problem

Our practice is proud to offer you the first and only therapeutic products for corneal cross-linking which have been FDA approved to treat progressive keratoconus. This approval offers an effective treatment for patients who, until recently, had no therapeutic options to limit the progression of this sight-threatening disease.